Welcome to Bar Legend Radio!

Bar Legend Radio was created in the city of Larissa,(Greece) by the need to listen to good music.

Blues is the name given to both a musical form and a music genre that originated in African-American communities of primarily the "Deep South" of the United States at the end of the 19th century from spirituals, work songs, field hollers, shouts and chants, and rhymed simple narrative ballads. The blues form, ubiquitous in jazz, rhythm and blues, and rock and roll is characterized by specific chord progressions, of which the twelve-bar blues chord progression is the most common.

John Mayall Biography

John Mayall was born on the 29th of November 1933 and grew up in a village not too far from Manchester, England. It was here as a teenager that he first became attracted to the jazz and blues 78s in his father's record collection. Initially it was all about guitarists such as Eddie Lang, Lonnie Johnson, Brownie McGhee, Josh White and Leadbelly. However once he heard the sounds of boogie woogie giants Albert Ammons, Pete Johnson and Meade Lux Lewis, his desire to play was all he could think of. At the age of 14 when he went to Manchester's Junior School of Art, he had access to a piano for the first time and he began to learn the basics of this exciting music. He also found time to continue learning the guitar and a couple of years later, the harmonica, inspired by Sonny Terry, Sonny Boy Williamson and Little Walter.
After his two years at art school, he joined the art department of a major department store while starting to build up his own record collection that was to be his source of inspiration to play the blues. At age eighteen when he was due for National Service he spent three years in the Royal Engineers as an office clerk in the south of England and in Korea all the time playing whenever he got a chance. As no-one seemed to be interested in this type of music, John felt pretty much of an outsider throughout his twenties until 1962 when the news broke in the Melody Maker that Alexis Korner and Cyril Davies had opened a club in Ealing devoted to blues music. After Britain's ten year traditional jazz boom had about run its course, a new generation was ready for something new. Out came the amplifiers, guitars and harmonicas and out came young enthusiasts from all over the country eager to sit in and form their own groups.
This was all the encouragement thirty-year old John needed and, giving up his graphic design job, he moved from Manchester to London and began putting musicians together under the banner of The Bluesbreakers. Although things were rough at first, the music quickly took off thanks to the popularity of the Rolling Stones, Georgie Fame, Manfred Mann, The Animals and Spencer Davis with a young Steve Winwood. John also backed blues greats John Lee Hooker, T-Bone Walker, and Sonny Boy Williamson on their first English club tours.
After a couple of years and many personnel changes, Eric Clapton quit the Yardbirds and John quickly offered him the job as his new guitarist. Although John had previously released a couple of singles and a live LP for Decca, the now classic collaboration between Eric and John resulted in the all time best selling classic 'John Mayall's Bluesbreakers featuring Eric Clapton'. However by the time it was entering the charts, he and bassist Jack Bruce had left to form Cream. So began a succession of future stars who would define their roots under John's leadership before leaving to form their own groups. Peter Green, John McVie and Mick Fleetwood became Fleetwood Mac. Andy Fraser formed Free, and Mick Taylor joined the Rolling Stones.
In 1969, with his popularity blossoming in the USA, John caused somewhat of a stir with the release of a drummer less acoustic live album entitled "The Turning Point", from which his song "Room To Move" was destined to become a rock classic. He received a gold record for this album. Attracted by the West Coast climate and culture, John then made his permanent move from England to Laurel Canyon in Los Angeles and began forming bands with American musicians. Throughout the 70's, John became further revered for his many jazz/rock/blues innovations featuring such notable performers as Blue Mitchell, Red Holloway, Larry Taylor, and Harvey Mandel.
In 1982, motivated by nostalgia and fond memories, John decided to re-form the original Bluesbreakers. Mick Fleetwood was unavailable at the time so John hired drummer Colin Allen to join with John McVie and Mick Taylor for a couple of tours and a video concert film entitled 'Blues Alive'. Featured greats were Albert King, Buddy Guy, Junior Wells and Etta James. By the time Mick and John had returned to their respective careers, public reaction had convinced Mayall that he should honor his driving blues roots. In Los Angeles, he selected his choices for a new incarnation of the Bluesbreakers. Officially launched in 1984, it included future stars in their own right, guitarists Coco Montoya and Walter Trout.
Throughout the eighties and nineties, John's popularity went from strength to strength with a succession of dynamic albums such as 'Behind The Iron Curtain', 'Chicago Line', 'A Sense of Place', and the Grammy-nominated 'Wake Up Call' that featured guest artists Buddy Guy, Mavis Staples, Albert Collins and Mick Taylor.
In 1993, Texas guitarist Buddy Whittington joined the Bluesbreakers and for the next ten years energized the band with his unique and fiery ideas. Making his recording debut on Mayall's 'Spinning Coin' album, he proved to be more than equal to following in the footsteps of his illustrious predecessors. Other modern classics followed. 'Blues For the Lost Days' and 'Padlock On The Blues', (the latter co-produced by John and his wife Maggie, featured a rare collaboration with his close friend John Lee Hooker. On "Along For The Ride", Mayall re-teamed with a number of his former mates, including Peter Green, Mick Taylor, Mick Fleetwood and John McVie, as well as ZZ Top's Billy Gibbons, Steve Miller, Billy Preston, Steve Cropper, Otis Rush, Gary Moore and Jeff Healey. The younger generation was well represented by teenage guitar sensations Shannon Curfman and Jonny Lang. In 2002 'Stories' debuted the Billboard blues charts at #1.
At a 70th Birthday celebration in aid of UNICEF in Liverpool, a concert was filmed, recorded and released as a DVD and double CD in December 2003. Along with the Bluesbreakers, it featured old friends Eric Clapton, Mick Taylor and Chris Barber. The BBC also aired an hour-long documentary on John's life and career entitled 'The Godfather of British Blues' and to coincide with the release of 'Road Dogs' in 2005, John was awarded an OBE by The Queen's Honours list. In the Spring of 2007, John Mayall's 56th album release,'In The Palace Of The King," was an entire studio album that honored and paid tribute to the music of Mayall's long-time hero of the blues, Freddie King. All garnered great reviews, critical and popular acclaim and represent Mayall's ongoing mastery of the blues and his continuing importance in contemporary music.
In addition, over the last ten years, Mayall released live recordings on his own online label, Private Stash Records. (Some still available from his website johnmayall.com. They included 'Time Capsule' (containing historic 1957-62 live tapes), 'UK Tour 2K', (from a 2000 British tour), 'Boogie Woogie Man', (a selection of solo performances), 'Cookin' Down Under', (a live DVD from Australia) and 'No Days Off', (another British live show).
By October 2008, the years of heavy touring were beginning to take their toll on John and he reluctantly announced his decision to take an indefinite break and permanently retire the name 'Bluesbreakers'. It was a sad occasion to say farewell to Buddy and the guys after twenty years of great music and camaraderie but things had reached another turning point. This caused quite a stir in blues circles and lead to rumors about total retirement. Happily for the fans, early in 2009 Eagle Records called upon John to come up with a new album. Feeling much revived after months away from music, he put together a new band for the project.
A few years ago Buddy Whittington had introduced John to a fellow Texan guitarist Rocky Athas and he recalled how impressed he'd been at the time. Luckily he answered the call and was eager to come on board for the proposed album. With the need for a rhythm section of dynamic strength, John turned to bassist Greg Rzab who recommended his fellow Chicagoan Jay Davenport on drums. Finally the three guys were put together with keyboardist Tom Canning and within two days of meeting up in Los Angeles, the album 'Tough' was in the can. It had taken all of three days in the studio and, ever since it's release and a growing schedule of world tours, a new era was born. Although Tom toured with John and the guys for the first year, eventually his other priorities conflicted and he quit.
Since then, as a four piece, the dynamics have escalated to a high degree and in November 2010 a live show in London was recorded and is currently available from John's website on DVD and double CD formats. Today, John can safely say he's never been happier with his band and long career. Revived and revitalized, the long road continues.

Nick Gravenites Biography


Nicholas George Gravenites (pronounced /ɡrævi-naɪtis/ born October 2, 1938, Chicago, Illinois), with stage names like Nick "The Greek" Gravenites and Gravy, is a blues, rock and folk singer–songwriter, and is best known for his work with Janis Joplin, Mike Bloomfield and several influential bands and names of the generation springing from the 1960s and 1970s.  He currently resides in Occidental, California.
According to author and pop music critic Joel Selvin, Gravenites is "the original San Francisco connection for the Chicago crowd." Gravenites is credited as a "musical handyman" helping such San Francisco bands as Quicksilver Messenger Service and Janis Joplin's first solo group, the Kosmic Blues Band. Gravenites also worked extensively with John Cipollina after producing the first Quicksilver Messenger Service album. He and Cipollina formed the Nick Gravenites–John Cipollina Band which toured a lot in Europe.

When the band Big Brother and the Holding Company reformed from 1969 to 1972 (without Janis Joplin), Nick was the lead singer.

Gravenites was also a songwriter for the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, which consisted of Elvin Bishop, Paul Butterfield, Sam Lay and Michael Bloomfield, then formed The Electric Flag with Butterfield guitarist Mike Bloomfield. Gravenites is also responsible for writing the score for The Trip, produced the music for the movie Steelyard Blues. He produced the pop hit "One Toke Over the Line" for Brewer & Shipley and the album Right Place, Wrong Time for Otis Rush, for which he was nominated for a Grammy Award. Together with John Kahn, Gravenites produced the album 'Not mellowed with Age' by Southern Comfort (CBS S 64125 - 1970). Over the years, Gravenites would often use pianist Pete Sears in his band "Animal Mind", including on his 1980 Blue Star album on which Sears played keyboards and bass. They also played together in front of 100,000 people on Earth Day 1990 at Crissy Field, San Francisco. Sears also joined him for a tour of Greece.

He still performs live in northern California. Gravenites was inducted to the Blues Hall of Fame in 2003 for his song "Born In Chicago". He recently toured with the Chicago Blues Reunion and a new Electric Flag Band.

Discography

Albums

  • 1968 Long Time Comin' The Electric Flag
  • 1969 My Labours
  • 1970 Be A Brother Big Brother and the Holding Company
  • 1972 Joplin In Concert
  • 1973 Steelyard Blues OST
  • 1980 Blue Star (Line Records)
  • 1982 Monkey Medicine The Nick Gravenites John Cipollina Band
  • 1991 Live At The Rodon Nick Gravenites and John Cipollina (Music Box)
  • 1996 Don't Feed The Animals
  • 1999 Kill My Brain
  • 2005 Buried Alive In The Blues (live)

Peter Green Biography

Peter Green (born Peter Allen Greenbaum, 29 October 1946, Bethnal Green, London) is a British blues-rock guitarist and the founder of the band Fleetwood Mac. Inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998 for his work with the group, Green's compositions have been covered by artists such as Santana, Aerosmith, Midge Ure, Tom Petty, and Judas Priest.

A major figure and bandleader in the "second great epoch" of the British blues movement, Green inspired B. B. King to say, "He has the sweetest tone I ever heard; he was the only one who gave me the cold sweats." Eric Clapton and Jimmy Page have both lauded his guitar playing. Green's playing was marked with idiomatic string bending and vibrato and economy of style. Though he played other guitars, he is best known for deriving a unique tone from his 1959 Gibson Les Paul.


He was ranked 38th in Rolling Stone's list of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time". His tone on the Bluesbreakers instrumental "The Super-Natural" was rated as one of the fifty greatest of all time by Guitar Player. In June 1996 Green was voted the third-best guitarist of all time in Mojo magazine.

With Fleetwood Mac
Singles

"I Believe My Time Ain’t Long" / "Rambling Pony" (1967)
"Shake Your Moneymaker" / "My Heart Beat Like a Hammer" (1968)
"Black Magic Woman" / "The Sun Is Shining" (1968)
"Need Your Love So Bad" / "Stop Messin’ Round" (1968)
"Albatross" / "Jigsaw Puzzle Blues" (1968)
"Man Of The World" / "Somebody’s Gonna Get Their Head Kicked In Tonite" (1969)
"Oh Well Pt.1" / "Oh Well Pt. 2" (1969)
"The Green Manalishi" / "World in Harmony" (1970)


Albums

Fleetwood Mac (1968)
Mr. Wonderful (1968)
Then Play On (1969)
English Rose (1969) USA
Penguin (1973) Track 8 "Night Watch" (uncredited)[1]
Tusk (1979) Track 13 "Brown Eyes" (uncredited)[1]

 Solo
Singles

"Heavy Heart" / "No Way Out" (1971)
"Beasts of Burden" / "Uganda Woman" (1972) with Nigel Watson
"Apostle" / "Tribal Dance" (1978)
"In the Skies" / "Proud Pinto" (1979)
"Walkin' the Road" / "Woman Don't" (1980)
"Loser Two Times" / "Momma Don'tcha Cry" (1980)
"Give Me Back My Freedom" / "Lost My Love" (1981)
"Promised Land" / "Bizzy Lizzy" (1981)
"The Clown" / "Time for Me to Go" (1982)
"Big Boy Now" / "Bandit" (1983)


Albums

The End of the Game (1970)
In the Skies (1979)
Little Dreamer (1980)
Whatcha Gonna Do? (1981)
White Sky (1982)
Kolors (1983)
A Case for the Blues (with Katmandu) (1984)

Compilations

Blue Guitar (1981)
Legend (1988)
Backtrackin' (1990)
A Rock Legend (1991)
Last Train to San Antone (1992)
Baby When the Sun Goes Down (1992)
Collection (1993)
Rock and Pop Legends (1995)
Green and Guitar (1996) – Music Collection MCCD244
Bandit (1997)
Blues for Dhyana (1998)
Alone with the Blues (2000)
The Clown (2001)
A Fool No More (2001) – MCPS Midnite Jazz & Blues Collection MJB100
Promised Land (2001)

JJ Cale Biography

JJ Cale (also J.J. Cale), born John Weldon Cale[1] on December 5, 1938, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma,[1] is a Grammy Award-winning American singer-songwriter and musician. Cale is one of the originators of the Tulsa Sound, a loose genre drawing on blues, rockabilly, country, and jazz influences. Cale's personal style has often been described as "laid back".

His only U.S. hit single, Crazy Mama, peaked at #22 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1972. During the 2006 documentary film To Tulsa and Back Cale recounts the story of being offered the opportunity to appear on Dick Clark's American Bandstand to promote the song, which would have moved the song higher on the charts. Cale declined when told he could not bring his band to the taping and would be required to lip-sync the words to the song.

His songs have been performed by a number of other musicians including "After Midnight" and "Cocaine" by Eric Clapton,"Cajun Moon" by Randy Crawford, "Magnolia" by Jai, "Bringing It Back" by Kansas, "Call Me the Breeze" and "I Got the Same Old Blues" by Lynyrd Skynyrd, "Travelin' Light" and "Ride Me High" by Widespread Panic, "Tijuana" by Harry Manx, and "Sensitive Kind" by Carlos Santana.

 Discography

Singles

  • 1958 Shock Hop/Sneaky [45 - as Johnny Cale]
  • 1960 Troubles, Troubles/Purple Onion [45 - as Johnny Cale Quintet]
  • 1961 Ain't That Lovin You Baby/She's My Desire [45 - as Johnny Cale Quintet]
  • 1971 Crazy Mama [45 as J.J. Cale], from the album Naturally, peaked at #22 on the U.S. single charts on April 8, 1972.

Albums

  • 1966 A Trip Down The Sunset Strip (with the Leathercoated Minds)
  • 1972 Naturally
  • 1973 Really
  • 1974 Okie
  • 1976 Troubadour
  • 1979 #5
  • 1981 Shades
  • 1982 Grasshopper
  • 1983 #8
  • 1990 Travel Log
  • 1992 #10
  • 1994 Closer to You
  • 1996 Guitar Man
  • 1997 Anyway the Wind Blows
  • 2001 Live
  • 2004 To Tulsa and Back
  • 2006 The Road to Escondido (with Eric Clapton)
  • 2009 Roll On

The Allman Brothers Band Biography

The Allman Brothers Band is an American rock/blues band once based in Macon, Georgia. The band was formed in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1969 by brothers Duane Allman (slide guitar and lead guitar) and Gregg Allman (vocals, organ, songwriting), who were supported by Dickey Betts (lead guitar, vocals, songwriting), Berry Oakley (bass guitar), Butch Trucks (drums), and Jai Johanny "Jaimoe" Johanson (drums). While the band has been called the principal architects of Southern rock, they also incorporate elements of blues, jazz, and country music, and their live shows have jam band-style improvisation and instrumental songs.

The band achieved its artistic and commercial breakthrough in 1971 with the release of At Fillmore East, featuring extended renditions of their songs "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" and "Whipping Post" and often considered one of the best live albums ever made. George Kimball of Rolling Stone magazine hailed them as "the best damn rock and roll band this country has produced in the past five years."A few months later, group leader Duane Allman was killed in a motorcycle accident. The group survived that and the death of bassist Oakley in another motorcycle accident a year later; with replacement members Chuck Leavell and Lamar Williams, the Allman Brothers Band achieved its peak commercial success in 1973 with the album Brothers and Sisters and the hit single "Ramblin' Man". Internal turmoil overtook the band soon after; the group dissolved in 1976, reformed briefly at the end of the decade with additional personnel changes, and dissolved again in 1982.


In 1989, the group reformed with some new members and has been recording and touring since. A series of personnel changes in the late 1990s was capped by the departure of Betts. The group found stability during the 2000s with Warren Haynes and Derek Trucks, the nephew of their drummer, serving as its guitarists, and became renowned for their month-long string of shows in New York City each spring. The band has been awarded eleven gold and five platinum albums between 1971 and 2005 and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995. Rolling Stone ranked them 52nd on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time in 2004.

 Discography
  • The Allman Brothers Band (1969)
  • Idlewild South (1970)
  • At Fillmore East (1971)
  • Eat a Peach (1972)
  • Brothers and Sisters (1973)
  • Win, Lose or Draw (1975)
  • Wipe the Windows, Check the Oil, Dollar Gas (1976)
  • Enlightened Rogues (1979)
  • Reach for the Sky (1980)
  • Brothers of the Road (1981)
  • Seven Turns (1990)
  • Shades of Two Worlds (1991)
  • An Evening with the Allman Brothers Band: First Set (1992)
  • Where It All Begins (1994)
  • An Evening with the Allman Brothers Band: 2nd Set (1995)
  • Peakin' at the Beacon (2000)
  • Hittin' the Note (2003)
  • One Way Out (2004)

Rory Gallagher Biography

Rory Gallagher born (2 March 1948-14 June 1995) was an Irish blues-rock multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, and bandleader. Born in Ballyshannon, County Donegal, Ireland, and raised in Cork, Gallagher recorded solo albums throughout the 1970s and 1980s, after forming the band Taste during the late 1960s. A talented guitarist known for his charismatic performances and dedication to his craft, Gallagher's albums have sold in excess of 30 million copies worldwide. Gallagher received a liver transplant in 1995, but died of complications later that year in London, England at the age of 47.

Gallagher was born in Ballyshannon, Co. Donegal; his father, Daniel, was employed by the Irish Electricity Supply Board, who were constructing a hydro-electric power plant on the Erne River above the town. The family moved, first to Derry City, where his younger brother Dónal was born in 1949, and then to Cork, where the two brothers were raised, and where Rory attended the North Monastery School. Their father had played the accordion and sang with the Tir Chonaill Ceile Band whilst in Donegal; their mother Monica was a singer and acted with the Abbey Players in Ballyshannon. The Theatre in Ballyshannon where Monica once acted is now called the Rory Gallagher Theatre. Both sons were musically inclined and encouraged by their parents: at age nine, Gallagher received his first guitar from them. He built on his burgeoning ability on ukelele in teaching himself to play the guitar and perform at minor functions. After winning a talent contest when he was twelve, Gallagher began performing in his adolescence with both his acoustic guitar, and an electric guitar he bought with his prize money. However, it was his purchase three years later of a 1961 Fender Stratocaster for £100 that became his primary instrument most associated with him for the span of his lifetime. Gallagher was initially attracted to skiffle after hearing Lonnie Donegan on the radio; Donegan frequently covered blues and folk performers from the United States. Subsequently, Gallagher began experimenting with folk, blues, and rock music. Unable to find or afford record albums, Gallagher stayed up late to hear Radio Luxembourg and AFN where the radio brought him his only exposure to the actual songwriters and musicians whose music moved him most. Influences he discovered, and cited as he progressed, included Woody Guthrie, Big Bill Broonzy, and Lead Belly. Initially, Gallagher struck out after just an acoustic sound. Singing and later using a brace for his harmonica, Gallagher began to learn to play slide guitar. Throughout the next few years of his musical development, Gallagher began learning to play on the alto saxophone, bass, mandolin, banjo, and the coral sitar with varying degrees of proficiency. He found it difficult to track down the names of the authors of the blues songs that he heard; usually through the likes of skiffle musicians like Lonnie Donegan. He relied entirely on radio programs and television. Occasionally, the jazz programs from the BBC would play some blues numbers, and he slowly found some song books for guitar, where he found the names of the actual composers of blues pieces. While still in school, playing songs by Buddy Holly and Eddie Cochran, he discovered his greatest influence in Muddy Waters. By his mid-teens, he began experimenting heavily with different blues styles.


Gallagher began playing after school with Irish showbands, while still a young teenager. In 1963, he joined one named Fontana, a sextet playing the popular hit songs of the day. The band toured Ireland and the United Kingdom, giving him the opportunity to acquire songbooks for the guitar, where he found the names of the actual composers of blues songs, in addition to earning the money for the payments that were due on his Stratocaster guitar. Gallagher began to influence the band's repertoire, beginning its transition from popular music, skirting along some of Chuck Berry's songs and by 1965, he had successfully molded Fontana into "The Impact", with a change in their lineup into an R&B group that played gigs in Ireland and Spain until disbanding in London. Gallagher left with the bassist and drummer to perform as a trio in Hamburg, Germany. In 1966, Gallagher returned to Ireland and, experimenting with other musicians back home in Cork, decided to form his own band.
  
Discography
  • Rory Gallagher – 1971
  • Deuce – 1971
  • Blueprint – 1973
  • Tattoo – 1973
  • Against the Grain – 1975
  • Calling Card – 1976
  • Photo-Finish – 1978
  • Top Priority – 1979
  • Jinx – 1982
  • Defender – 1987
  • Fresh Evidence – 1990

Gov't Mule Biography

Gov't Mule (pronounced Government Mule) is a rock and jam band formed in 1994 as an Allman Brothers Band side project. They released their debut album Gov't Mule in 1995. Gov't Mule has become a staple act at music festivals across North America, boasting members from other notable bands.

History


1990s
When The Allman Brothers Band reformed in 1989 in response to the popularity of their Dreams box set, Warren Haynes was added on lead guitar and Allen Woody was added on bass. The two shared a love for '60s power trios, like Cream, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, and the James Gang. Haynes, Woody, and former Dickey Betts drummer Matt Abts came together as Gov't Mule during Allman Brothers breaks. They released their debut album Gov't Mule in 1995, which was followed by Live from Roseland Ballroom, released in 1996.

When the Allman Brothers were not forthcoming with any new material, Haynes and Woody left to concentrate full-time on Gov't Mule in 1997. Dose, their second studio effort, was released in early 1998. They were joined by members of the Allman Brothers, the Black Crowes, and Parliament/Funkadelic for their 1998 New Year's Eve concert. This was released in both a two and four CD version as Live... With a Little Help from Our Friends. The performances exposed some of the bands' influences, covering Neil Young, Free, Traffic, Jimi Hendrix, Little Feat, Black Sabbath, and Mongo Santamar?a (via John Coltrane).

2000-2003
In February, 2000, the band released Life Before Insanity, to critical praise, and although the band had already experienced previous successes, they anticipated a greater commercial success with this album. Unfortunately, Allen Woody was found dead in New York City in August of that year. On , 2000 a benefit concert was organized called "One for Woody", with the proceeds going to Woody's daughter, Savannah Woody, for her education. The Allman Brothers, The Black Crowes, Phil Lesh and Friends, Jimmy Herring, Edwin McCain and other friends of Woody and Gov't Mule also performed at the concert. Haynes and Abts considered ending the band after Woody's death, but continued to do limited touring in the Fall of 2000 supporting Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals as an homage to Woody. Their subsequent "Smile at Half Mast Tour" that followed was named in reference to a poem Haynes wrote for Woody's funeral.

At the "One for Woody" performance and subsequently at other shows, Haynes began appearing with the Allman Brothers Band again. With Dickey Betts' departure from the Allmans, Haynes came back full time to the band at the beginning of 2001 and has continued splitting his time between the Allman Brothers, Gov't Mule and for a period Phil Lesh and Friends and the reformed Grateful Dead bands.

The next year, Haynes and Abts began to record a tribute CD using some of Woody's favorite bass players. These sessions resulted in two CDs The Deep End, Volume 1 (2001) and The Deep End, Volume 2 (2002). A documentary of the recording sessions was also made by Phish bassist Mike Gordon called Rising Low. Bass contributions to the CDs came from Jack Bruce of Cream, John Entwistle of The Who, Mike Watt of Minutemen, Les Claypool of Primus, Flea of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, and Chris Squire of Yes among others.

When it came to touring in support of the Deep End CDs, Haynes and Abts used a revolving door of keyboardists and bassists. Keyboardists included Chuck Leavell, formerly of the Allman Brothers and known for his current work with the Rolling Stones, Rob Barraco of Phil Lesh and Friends and Zen Tricksters, Phish's Page McConnell and Danny Louis. Bassists included, among others, Dave Schools of Widespread Panic, Oteil Burbridge of the Allman Brothers, Les Claypool of Primus, Victor Wooten of the Flecktones, George Porter Jr. of The Meters, Greg Rzab formerly of The Black Crowes and the Buddy Guy Band, and Andy Hess, also formerly of The Black Crowes. Louis and Hess were eventually named as permanent members of Gov't Mule.

2004-2008
The first CD with Louis and Hess, Deja Voodoo, was released in September 2004, and additional material from those sessions was released in 2005 as Mo' Voodoo. The new lineup's second full release, High & Mighty, was released on , 2006, and it was followed in 2007 by a dub/reggae album called Mighty High - including versions of covers and original songs with special guest appearances by Michael Franti, Toots Hibbert, and Willi Williams.

Gov't Mule continues to tour extensively and have become staple acts at many music festivals including Bonnaroo, Wakarusa, Mountain Jam, Vegoose, All Good, and their annual New Orleans Jazzfest night show (where they filmed and recorded the last show of the Deepest End tours, with 17 guest musicians in a 6 hour show).

Every year since 1989, Warren Haynes hosts the Annual Christmas Jam in his hometown of Asheville. The concert usually takes place the weekend before Christmas at the Asheville Civic Center, as a fundraiser for Habitat For Humanity. Many artists who play at the X-Mas Jam also perform separate gigs in various Asheville clubs, usually the day before the Jam proper. The Pre-Jam, as it is called, features many of the same artists, in a smaller club. The 19th edition of the Jam took place on December 15, 2007 with performances by Kevn Kinney, Grace Potter and The Nocturnals, Shelly Colvin, Jason Isbell and The 400 Unit, Jackson Browne, G. Love, Bruce Hornsby and Peter Frampton among others. Gov't Mule headlined.

On June 28, 2008, Gov't Mule performed as a Power Trio for the first time since 2000, this time with its regular bassist Andy Hess. The band titled their set "Old School Mule" and ran through some of their older songs such as "Wandering Child" and "Thorazine Shuffle."

On September 15, 2008, Stefani Scamardo (Warren Haynes' wife) announced on her Sirius radio show that Andy Hess would be leaving the band and a new bassist would be in place for the fall tour. Hess was subsequently replaced by Jorgen Carlsson, who had been rehearsing with the band for six months.

2009
On August 17, 2009, it was announced on the band's official website that Gov't Mule's eighth studio album, entitled By a Thread, is scheduled to be released on October 27th, 2009.

On the same date, the first track of the new album, called ?Broke Down On The Brazos? (featuring Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top), was made available for listening on the website.

Discography


Gov't Mule, 1995
Live from Roseland Ballroom, 1996
Dose, 1998
Live... With a Little Help from Our Friends, 1999
Life Before Insanity, 2000
The Deep End, Volume 1, 2001
The Deep End, Volume 2, 2002
The Deepest End, Live in Concert, 2003
Deja Voodoo, 2004
Mo' Voodoo (EP), 2005
High & Mighty, 2006
Mighty High, 2007
Holy Haunted House, 2008
By a Thread, 2009

The Story of The Blues by Paul Oliver

Roll over, Beethoven! When the Beatles recorded the iconoclastic title it wasn't only Beethoven who had to move aside but the composer ofthe song, the rhythm and blues singer, Chuck Berry, as well. When the Rolling Stones were Confessing the Blues they were confessing, too, to the influence of Walter Brown and B.B.King: when the Animals acclaimed the Big Boss Man the real boss man was Jimmy Reed. It was Lightnin' Hopkins who was preserved when The Lovin' Spoonful put the Blues in the Bottle: it was a Mississippi Black, Bukka White, on parole from Parchman Farm, who was Bob Dylan's muse for Fixin' to Die Blues. Using the words and music of a Memphis "gum-ball raker", Gus Cannon, the Rooftop Singers offered the invitation to Walk Right In. Popular music has been walking right in on the blues ever since.